Pediatric Dentists - Sheboygan
1313 N Taylor Dr,
Sheboygan, WI 53081-3090
(920) 452-7336

Click To View...

Posts for: February, 2015

NancyODellHelpsPutNewMomsAtEaseAboutInfantOralHealth

During Nancy O'Dell's interview with Dear Doctor magazine, the former co-anchor of Access Hollywood and new co-anchor of Entertainment Tonight could not resist her journalistic instincts to turn the tables so that she could learn more about a baby's oral health. Here are just some of the facts she learned from the publisher of Dear Doctor about childhood tooth decay, pacifier use and what the right age is for a child's first visit to the dentist.

Many moms-to-be and parents or caregivers of young children are surprised to learn that around age 1 is the ideal time to schedule a child's first visit to the dentist. This visit is crucial because it sets the stage for the child's oral health for the rest of his or her life. It can also be quite beneficial for the parents, too, as they can be reassured that there are no problems with development and that the child's teeth appear to be growing properly. And if by chance we identify any concerns, we will discuss them with you as well as any necessary treatment strategies.

Nancy also wanted to learn more about pacifiers — specifically, if it is a good idea for parents to encourage their use. Obviously, children are born with a natural instinct for sucking, so giving a child a pacifier seems totally harmless. Pacifiers definitely have some advantages; however, if used for too long — past the age of 18 months — they can cause long-term changes in the child's developing mouth (both the teeth and the jaws).

Another problem that parents and caregivers need to be aware of is baby bottle syndrome. This is a condition that develops in children who are perpetually sucking on a baby bottle filled with sugary fluids such as formula, fruit juices, cola or any liquids containing a large amount of sugar, honey or other sweeteners. It is important to note that a mother's own breast milk or cow's milk are good choices for feeding babies, as they both contain lactose, a natural sugar that is less likely to cause decay. However, if these liquids are placed in a bottle and a child is allowed to suck on it throughout the night, they, too, can promote tooth decay. The key is to feed your child properly while avoiding all-night feedings and liquids loaded with sugar.

To read the entire Dear Doctor magazine article on Nancy O'Dell as well as to learn more about a baby's oral health, continue reading “Nancy O'Dell — A life full of smiles.” Or you can contact us today to schedule an appointment so that we can conduct a thorough examination, listen to your concerns, answer your questions and discuss any necessary treatment options.


By Just Kids Dental SC
February 13, 2015
Category: Oral Health
DentalInjuriesinSportsATrueFalseQuiz

Everyone knows that football players and boxers wear mouthguards to protect their teeth from injury — in fact, it's thought that this essential piece of protective gear was first developed, around a century ago, for the latter sport. But did you know that many other athletic activities carry a high risk of dental injury?

How much do you know about dental injuries in sports? Take this quiz and find out!

True or False: Of all sports, baseball and basketball are associated with the largest number of dental injuries.

True. While these games aren't categorized as “collision” sports, the damage caused by a flying elbow or a foul ball may be quite traumatic. Tooth damage or loss can create not only esthetic problems, but also functional problems, like difficulty with the bite. Missing teeth can also be expensive to fix — running up a lifetime tab of some $10,000 - 20,000 if they canâ??t be properly preserved or replanted.

True or False: In general, oral-facial injuries from sports decline from the teen years onward.

True. Sports-related dental injuries, like other trials of adolescence, seem to peak around the teenage years. It's thought that the increased skill level of participants in the older age groups reduces the overall incidence of injury. But there's a catch: when dental injuries do occur in mature athletes, they tend to be more serious. So, protecting your teeth while playing sports is important at any age.

True or False: Over 80% of all dental injuries involve the upper front teeth.

True. For one thing, the front teeth areâ?¦ in front, where they can easily come in contact with stray objects. An individual's particular anatomy also plays a role: The more the front teeth “stick out” (referred to as “overjet” in dental parlance), the more potential for injury. In any case, theyâ??re the most likely to be damaged, and most in need of protection.

True or False: Your chance of receiving a dental injury in non-contact sports is very slim.

False. Even “non-contact” athletes moving at high rates of speed can be subject to serious accidents. Activities like bicycling, motocross, skateboarding, skiing and snowboarding all carry a risk. The accidents that result can be some of the most complicated and severe.

True or False: An athlete who doesn't wear a mouthguard is 60 times more likely to suffer harm to the teeth.

True. This figure comes straight from the American Dental Association. So if you want to reduce your chance of a sports-related dental injury, you know what to do: Wear a mouthguard!

What's the best kind of mouthguard? Like any piece of sports equipment, it's the one that's custom-fitted just for you. We can fabricate a mouthguard, based on a precise model of your teeth, that's tough, durable and offers the best level of protection. And, as many studies have shown, that's something you just can't get from an off-the-shelf model.

If you have concerns about sports-related dental injuries and their prevention, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Athletic Mouthguards” and “An Introduction to Sports Injuries & Dentistry.”




Archive: